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on leaks by edward snowden. in a moment we will be joined by journalist glenn greenwald who first broke the snowden story. first, we turn to saturday's protest in washington. it was organized by the stop watching us coalition. jesselyn radack, a former justice department who now works for the government accountability project, read a message from edward snowden. >> we are here to remind our government officials that they are public service -- servants. this is about the unconstitutional, unethical, and immoral actions of the modern- day surveillance state, and how we all must work together to remind the government to stop them. know,bout our right to our right to associate freely, and to live in a free and open democratic society. [applause] witnessing an american moment in which ordinary people from high school to high office stand up to oppose a dangerous trend in government. we are told what is unconstitutional is not illegal. but we will not be fooled. we have not forgotten the fourth amendment in our bill of rights prohibits government that only from searching our personal effects
administration is rejecting calls to plant -- grand, sita nsa leaker edward snowden. in a letter given to a german lawmaker last week, snowden called on the u.s. to drop charges against him, writing "speaking the truth is not a crime." on sunday, dan pfeiffer ruled out clemency and said snowden should return to face criminal charges. in some of the latest snowden's disclosures, the "new york times" reports the nsa intercepted the talking points of view into secretary -- you would secretary-general ban ki- moon ahead of a meeting with president obama in april. we will have more on the story with the reporter scott shane after the headlines. a newly disclosed document shows the british government justified detaining the partner journalist glenn greenwald by accusing him of espionage and terrorism. in august, david maranda was on his way home to brazil when he was held from his nine hours at london's heathrow airport. he faced repeated interrogation, had many personal items seized, .ncluding some -- thumb drives an internal police order authorizing greatest attention from that they says -
couldn't breathe at points because of excitement and shock. >> the source was edward snowden. >> the nsa specifically targets the communications of everyone. it ingests them by default. it collects them in it's system and it filters them and it analyzes them and it measures them and it stores them. >> up to that point, the director of national intelligence, who oversees nearly 20 u.s. intelligence agencies, had been telling the public a different story. >> does the nsa collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans? >> no sir. >> it does not? >> not wittingly. there are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect, but not wittingly. >> after the snowden revelations, clapper apologized, explaining that he'd given the "least untruthful" answer. >> i sitting at my desk certainly had the authorities to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a federal judge to even the president if i had a personal email. >> so everything from learning all your metadata, with whom you're speaking, who's emailing you, where you are when you do it, how long yo
-kept secrets are out. by now, most of the world has heard the name edward snowden. the former national security agency contractor who released thousands of classified documents about government surveillance in one of the most significant leaks in u.s. history. he's been charged with espionage and has been living in russia under temporary asylum. the american journalist at the center of the story lives in brazil. >> we've had to come to rio to speak to glenn greenwald. he hasn't returned to the united states since he broke the story about the nsa surveillance programs for fear of being prosecuted. >> the nsa's goal really is the elimination of privacy globally. it is literally a system designed to monitor all forms of human behavior inside the united states, which is the ultimate surveillance state. >> last december, glenn greenwald received an email from a person who didn't identify himself. >> we still didn't know who he was, where he worked, but he was saying he had access to large amounts of very sensitive surveillance information that show the united states government was violating the law
by edward snowden. what he is now asking dpor -- asking for as washington tries to rebuild some relationships. >> it is vital when it comes to america safe and keeping our european allies safe. as i said earlier, the tensions that have been caused by these disclosures are ones that we acknowledge and ones we are addressing directly. >>> a check of the headlines. plans are in the work tips to prove the quality of life in the largest syrian refugee camp. it is home to more than 100,000 people that fled the civil war. they are swapping their squad cars for big rigs. the reason? by sitting up higher they have a chance of spotting drivers who are texting. >>> and there is going to be a partial solar eclipse visible to most of the east coast tomorrow at sunrise. get up early. it is a rare eclipse where the moon blocks part of the sun and completely in other parts of the world. >> obamacare was the focus of withering hearings this week over the website tee yeahs scow that put the white house on the defensive and em boldened the critics. >> the central issue here is not can we build a g
about the meeting with edward snowden and the letter to the government. edward snowden be willing to talk to german investigators or politicians or even come to germany to be interviewed? he could come to germany if it were guaranteed that he would be secure in germany or a comparable country. the green and the left party want to question snowden about u.s. surveillance activity. he could be offered asylum or safe passage in return. christian democrats it would exacerbate tensions with washington. one alternative being discussed is to meet with snowden in moscow. usif snowden was to provide with information, we will take that into consideration. verification or new information would be a good thing. -- not is nothing something the u.s. would be likely to find good. it reiterated its position on snowden on friday. which he iss with charged are serious. our view that the right thing to do is for him to return or be returned to the united states to face those charges. german government is in a tricky situation. how can they find out more about u.s. espionage without deepening the dip
frederick, but how are you doing? >> edward snowden's nsa revelations reaching new heights, getting spoofed on snl. but now the leaker is seeking ce clemens city. >>> and toronto's embattled mayor says he will stay in office. >>> and the sbepgs intentional that was the youtube music awards. that's a real thing? it is? okay. this is "way too early". good morning. i'm bill karins in for brian shactman. it's monday, november 4th. we'll also show and you scary moment in last night's texas/colt game. but first, the country's third biggest airport fully up and running again, but underlying safety concerns after a man used an assault arrival to kill one tsa agent and badly injured two other people. paul ciancia is in critical condition after being shot multiple times by officers. he was carrying five high capacity magazines, a bag of ammo and happennd written lette explaining his rampage. gun control advocates say the incident is unlikely to spark any head way in the limit of gun sales. >>> later today, the president will speak at an organizing for action health care summit looking to rally grass
forward. for edward snowden, it's a fate he was willing to risk. >> you live a privileged life. you're living in hawaii, in paradise, and making a ton of money. what would it take to make you leave everything behind? the greatest fear that i have regarding the outcome for america, of these disclosures, is that nothing will change. >> i think what the nsa in our nation is trying to do is protect our people and other people. you know, i would say, do you speak arabic? >> do i? no. maafi mushkila kil shi tamam, alhamdulillah. and so from my perspective, we want to have a world where there are no problems, where everything is ok, and we can say thanks. so from our perspective, we have to work together as nations to do that, and it takes intelligence and the least intrusive way we could think of was metadata. if, if anyone has any ideas how they can do it better, let us know. >> but what price are people willing to pay for security? and what could mass surveillance do to the nature of american society, and its promises of democracy, liberty and privacy? >> if you allow the government, th
edward snowden right thing in the major german news weekly dish beagle he's put forward what he calls his manifesto for truth in which he calmed and state security agencies around the world didn't set out to simeon only handle so that journalists that if published his articles in various publications around the world. he also delays on to saying that we need to stop this kind of spying culture that is taken over it's all parts of a teenager and that and make a set of articles about edward snowden inmates in the gym and paper it comes on the back if that support for edwards to admit it in geneva on animosity increase we've seen a group of over fifty as senior figures calling for him actually to be granted asylum in germany now in the optical it to say that something that perhaps they had the car in german government wooden supports pounds because suggesting a bed and some of skeletons in their own clothes that could come out if there was a mean age investigation into just exactly what's it going on in tennis if the nsa spying program. how about a monk spends fifty that say that it snowed a
for wednesday. >> nsa whistleblower edward snowden has been charged with espionage. but he wants to be let off the hook saying they are looking to criminalize a local speech in a letter friday the northbounding sa whistleblower asked for international hope to persuade the us to give him clemency. >> he violated u.s. law. he should return to the united states and face justice. >> snowden has also indicated that he would like to testify before congress withoabout the surveillance program but lawmakers wonsay that won't hap either. >> houston taking on the colts. the texans were rolling through the first half. andre johnson pulls in his third touchdown of the game. texans up 21-3. what we told you about texan's head coach gary kubiak collapsing it's down there from houston they go on to drop their 6th straight. 27-24. raider rs taking on the eagles. it was the colts the eagles quarterback shutting down the raider's defense for a record tieing 7 touchdown passes. connecting with riley cooper for three of his 7 touchdowns. finishing the became 406 yards, 7 touchdowns no interceptions. >> it was a d
as the leaks keep on coming from edward snowden from the top adviser to the president about what the president knew and when he knew it. first today's trivia question. what is the most populous state with one woman in its congressional delegation. the first person to tweet the correct question will get the on air shout out. the answer and more coming up next. [ female announcer ] who are we? we are the thinkers. the job jugglers. the up all-nighters. and the ones who turn ideas into action. we've made our passions our life's work. we strive for the moments where we can say, "i did it!" ♪ we are entrepreneurs who started it all... with a signature. legalzoom has helped start over 1 million businesses, turning dreamers into business owners. and we're here to help start yours. i remember thinking there's a lot i have to do... check my blood sugar, eat better. start insulin. today i learned there's something i don't have to do anymore. my doctor said with levemir® flexpen... i don't have to use a syringe and a vial. levemir® flexpen comes prefilled with long-acting insulin taken once daily for
. >>> and edward snowden says british counterparts to the nsa are some of the worst offenders to government oversight. >>> welcome to "around the world." police came within minutes of stopping the alleged l.a.x. shooter from heading to the airport before friday's rampage. one. new details we're learning today. this is from an exclusive interview with a woman who knows the suspect and his three roommates. 23-year-old paul ciancia is charged with murdering a tsa officer. ciancia is in critical condition after being shot by police officers. the fbi says he set out to kill tsa employees, and now a woman who knows the suspect tells our miguel marquez, that one roommate, who had no idea what was going on, even drove him to the airport. >> he asked one of the roommates if he could have a ride to the airport. >> why did he need a ride? >> he said he was going back home. either that his dad was kind of sick and he had to deal with some family issues. >> did anyone ever see a ticket? >> no. >> he did mention what day. that morning, he doesn't knock and says, i need to leave. can you take me now. >> d
that killed a u.s. ambassador. >> accused nsa leaker edward snowden making new friends and maybe looking for a new home. germany maybe? >> and unearthed a drug tunnel between mexico and the united states that is so sophisticated, it is being called a supertunnel. we're going to take you on a tour. welcome to around the world". i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company today. welcome to our international viewers with us all week. >> first we're going to get to this, benghazi, libya, it was just last ept, four americans were killed in a terrorist attack. one of them the u.s. ambassador. >> today a lot of pressure from republicans in congress to hear directly from cia operatives who were in libya during the attack and also afterwards. so far they have not talked to congress. >> we here at cnn have reported the cia has specifically told those operators to keep quiet. drew griffin is with the cnn investigations unit. drew, first of all, excellent reporting on all of this. they're pushing back right now on what you're reporting. what are they saying? >> being complet
-- senior u.s. lawmakers have rejected pleas for clemency by edward snowden. it comes days after a german lawmaker published a letter from the fugitive saying he is ready to testify to congress. snowden extending an olive branch to the united states. last week the former national security agency contractor appealed for clemency and said he was ready to testify to congress about u.s. surveillance . but on sunday lawmakers flatly rejected his offer. , ife had an opportunity what he was was a whistleblower, to pick up the phone and call the house committee, the senate intelligence committee, and say, look, i have some information that i -- that you want to see. that did not happen. now he has done this in almost a service to our country. >> a view shared by the chairman of the house intelligence committee. >> he does need to own up to what he has done, and if he wants to talk through why he did those things, that would be the appropriate time and the appropriate way to do it. >> a white house adviser said snowden's, t request is not under investigation. snowden has been granted temporary asy
. >>> coming up on "new day," a few proceed from edward snowden. he says he's no criminal. wait until you hear our response from the leaders in the nation's capitol. he says he is sorry for past mistakes for smoking co-cable. he will not resign and he wants the public to see the alleged evidence. t thing i need. seriously? let's take this puppy over to midas and get you some of the good 'ol midas touch. hey you know what? i'll drive! i really didn't think this through. brakes, tires, oil, everything. (whistling) hall we do is go out to dinner.? that's it? i mean, he picks up the tab every time, which is great...what? he's using you. he probably has a citi thankyou card and gets 2x the points at restaurants. so he's just racking up points with me. some people... ugh! no, i've got it. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards american express credit card, every purchase earns you 2% cash back, which is deposited in your fidelity account. is that it? actually... there's no annual fee and no l
and nsa spying story. all of it coming by leaks by the former u.s. defense contractor edward snowden. tonight's revelations involve very big names in the internet and e-mail world. now big companies are calling for new privacy laws to stop u.s. intelligence agencies from breaking into their data overseas. for more on all of it we turn to our chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell in our d.c. newsroom tonight. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the tech companies worry they are losing an arm's race with the nsa which nbc news confirms has been hacking into google and yahoo data centers around the world as fast as the company has put up firewalls. vacuuming up e-mail and phone records. google and yahoo data centers in all corners of the globe reach targets by data collection by nsa and british intelligence. as first reported in the "washington post" they found more documents leaked by edward snowden, hundreds of thousands of e-mails, search queries and other activity collected, decoded and filtered and possible intelligence targets transmitted to the n
second term in peril. edward snowden has this new manifesto that is out from russia, calls for reform in surveillance justify his leaks of classified information. we will see if he agrees with him on that. and the changing landscape of designer fashion. the top names in the country, here with us this hour to talk about that. all that and dagen mcdowell this hour on "markets now." all right. dagen: we're giving you a makeover. connell: that would be great. get him to work on that. dagen: we put you in like a camo jacket. the market slight losses here, we are also getting news on that settlement with the justice department, nicole petallides has you covered at the new york stock exchange. lauren: the dow down to the downside. the nasdaq and the s&p squeezing out some gains although very minimal. talking fractional news for the nasdaq and the s&p with the up arrow's up nearly two points as the s&p is up .34. a third of a point. very small moves despite the fact everybody still continues to believe you will not see any tapering from the fed anytime soon. some of the steel stocks doing ver
merkel's phone and allowed it to continue. it came out after edward snowden said the u.s. has spied on world leaders. what president obama spoke to chancellor merkel when the two spoke about the spying. >> the president said we're not going to do this going forward. >> but it may have been done in the past. >> we don't want to get into the business of inventorying everything we've done in the past but what we're looking at is how can we both make necessary reforms in how we gather intelligence and how can we be more transparent about what we're doing with our allies and the public. >> joining me now ambassador mark ginsburg. it's great to have you here. the white house finds itself caught between a rock and a hard place. now they have to come out and ask for forgiveness as opposed to permission, because they never would have gotten permission to do this. but this is not unheard of. this is what we do as a country. >> spies r us. >> we've been doing it for a long time. is it just the fact that we are surprised that it would get to this level and now expect to believe that the white h
something that comes to mind that what we now know about spying comes from the leaks of edward snowden. >> yeah, glenn greenwald lives in rio and has all of snowden's documents. snowden is on a one-year temporary asylum and not giving any interviews. and greenwald has become the spokesperson for this. so we went down to rio. we were fortunate enough to spend a couple of days with him. and just kind of see what his life is like right now. but it's really fascinating, because when history looks back on this, greenwald will be a big part of this. >> also in your show your are going to talk about the impact on washington and what you found here in this environment was a bit of a surprise. >> it is a surprise. it cuts across the partisan lines so broodly. we interviewed allen west the former tea party representative and allen grayson who is a representative from florida in the house right now, and their views were very, very similar on this. that it's unconstitutional it lax oversight from congress, not enough is being done about it. the only people who seem to support it are people who hav
currently in the u.s. senate. >>> a growing fury after more allegations growing out of edward snowden's leaked documents. this time about the nsa tapping world alabalealleys. fault lines correspondent explores what it is like to live under constant surveillance. ♪ >> in many ways the nsa surveillance story can seem abstract. sure the sgovment collecting information, but what does that really mean for someone's life? to fine out we went to meet a group of people who definitely know they are being spied on. >> after 9/11 it wasn't just the nsa that increased surveillance. here at the city level in new york, the nypd brought in to senior officials from the cia to help spy on its own citizens. the program is targeting one community, muslims. secret documents show that the nypd is conducting surveillance of entire muslim neighborhoods. >> they visited book stores, cafes, hookah joints, of course mosques. >> reporter: and record conversations using hidden microphones, collect the names and phone gragaits. >> how were they reacting to foreign events abroad, the egyptian revolution or the c
almost all based on information leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggest the u.s. has been spying on many countries and their leaders, including important u.s. allies. >> the white house denies the report that president obama knew the n.s.a. was eavesdropping on german leader angela merkel. we have the latest. >> a nine member delegation will meet with senior government officials over allegations of widespread spying against leaders. new allegations surfaced that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. according to the wall street journal, the president was unaware the n.s.a. was spying on world leaders and ordered the agency to stop some of the monitoring programs after learning of them. >> the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> it's not just the europeans who are upset. over the weekend, thousands marched on washington to express their outrage. >> against mass surveillance and i'm truly honored to speak for all whistle blowers. >> some memb
national security agency contractor edward snowden is prepared to reveal what he knows. german media say opposition lawmaker traveled to moscow to meet with snowden. he says snowden told him that he's ready to speak to german prosecutors and members of parliament. they are looking into allegations american agents tapped the cell phone of chancellor angela merkel. strobel says snowden made it clear he knows a lot. snowden has revealed details of several top u.s. surveillance programs. u.s. leaders are demanding the russian officials return him to the u.s. so he can face charges of espionage and theft of government property. >>> germany has criticized the apparent spying operation against merkel. now u.s. secretary of state john kerry admitted some of the spying activities were inappropriate, but stopping short of clarifying the details. kerry spoke to a conference in london via video link on thursday. >> some of these actions have reached too far, and we are going to make sure that does not happen in the future. >> but he defended u.s. intelligence gathering, saying it has stopped numerou
to talk directly to the former u.s. intelligence operative edward snowden about the nsa's spying activities. >> if the message is that mr. snowden wants to provide us with information and tell us something, then we will gladly accept that. because any clarification, information, and fax we can obtain is a good thing -- and facts we can obtain is a good thing. >> the announcement came after a politician returned from russia with a letter from snowden, offering to give sworn testimony on u.s. spying activities directed at german citizens and leaders. he held a surprise three-hour meeting with snowden in russia on thursday night. snowden reportedly offered to give testimony in germany, but his lawyer said a meeting could only take race and russia -- take place in russia for legal reasons. snowden would have a lot to say to the german people. >> also on friday, germany became the first european country to allow a third gender option for newborn babies. under the new law, babies born with characteristics of both sexes will no longer have to be registered as male or female. many inters
national security agency contractor, edward snowden, one former aide to the chancellor said that snowden has done the western world a great service and it's up to us to help him. today on "face the nation," rejecting the idea that snowden be granted any clemency. >> can he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee. that didn't happen. and now he's done this enormous disservice to our country and i think the answer is no clemency. >> a republican counterpart in the house also dismissed the idea. >> no, i don't see any reason. you know, we -- i wouldn't do that. >> the suspect in friday's fatal shooting of a tchl sa altsa age has been charged with murder. paul ciancia wrote a note indicating that he intended to die during the attack. he survived after being wounded by the police. >>> four prominent scientists, including james hansen, distributed a joint letter citing the need for nuclear power plants. they wrote renewables like wind and solar and biomass cannot scale up fast enoug
foundation, 55% of people surveyed now say they have enough information to understand. >>> edward snowden wants the u.s. to drop the charges against him. snowden has been charged with federal crimes for leaking classified u.s. documents. he released a letter asking for international help to persuade u.s. authorities to let him off the hook. snowden says he would like to testify before congress about the nsa surveillance programs. california senator dianne feinstein says he's already had his chance. >> he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee, and say look, i have information you ought to see. that didn't happen. >> the documents snowden has released about the nsa surveillance programs around the world have angered many u.s. allies. >>> a high-tech research firm said the information on spying could have an economic impact of $180 billion a year in lost income. reportedly the revelations have made companies around the world wary of doing business with american internet firms. >
politician says edward snowden is willing to testify in an investigation that u.s. agents monitored the cell phone of german chancellor angela merkel. the lawmaker met the former u.s. intelligence contractor in moscow. german media say the legislator of the opposition green party hans christian strobella spent three hours with snowden. snowden reportedly said he's ready to speak before german prosecutors and members of parliament. he told german tv that snowden appeared to have a lot of information about the eavesdropping issue. observers believe his testimony will help shed light on the alleged spying but they also expect washington to oppose the move. the u.s. government demands that moscow return snoweden to face charges. he now lives in russia under asylum. >>> representatives of an international monitoring organization are reporting progress in the first phase of their efforts to rid syria of chemical weapons. officials with the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons say the government has destroyed all of its production facilities. >> the syrian government has completed w
was terminated after the white house learned of it. meanwhile in the latest example of edward snowden screwing over america the spanish newspaper reported that the nsa monitored the 60 million phone calls made in spain -- i didn't know they had that many phones -- last december. they refused to grant snowden asylum. >> see if that is not bullying, i don't know what bullying is, and i think there should be an organization to punish those dogs. did the president know about the spying on merkel or did he not know or did he not not know. >> remember, merkel rhymes with erkle. >> merkel. i don't know if he knew, but there is nobody more frustrated and more outraged than president obama. we should just trust he can get to the bottom. >> i think he is upset. he gets things done. if he didn't know we were listening in on the phone calls of our friendly government leader should he have? shouldn't he let the nsa do what they want to do? >> no, we know two things. he was the last to know and no one is more upset. but it is weird how he knows nothing. he is the last to know other than killing bin laden be
were spying on allies and he thinks it is awful he should thank edward snowden for reviewing this. i think he owes edward snowden a little something. >> you do bring up snowden and baker you mentioned his name a couple times. what is going on here? why are we going to get him? >> here is the problem. this is a self-inflicted wound. if the president had done what you would have anticipated the commander-in-chief to do which is head to state to head of state and if he contacted the chinese authorities and said we want him back now, then i believe the chinese authorities with the right pressure -- it matters who delivers the message. but that moment obama said this is a legal ib you and i will have midlevel functionaries deal with. it do you think putin will look less manly than the chinese? it is not going to happen. now as long as he is in moscow there is not much to be done. if he makes his way from moscow to latin america, all bets are off. >> even you, andy, who have some weird homo-erotic attachment to snowden, you have to admit he is hurting this country. if you were president yo
and fuel which his company provided. >>> edward snowden wants the united states to drop charges against him. snowden has been charged with federal crimes for leaking classified u.s. documents. he released a letter to persuade u.s. authorities to let him off the hook. snowden says he wants to testify before congress about the nsa's surveillance programs. california senator dianne feinstein says he already had that chance. >> he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee and say look, i have information you ought to see. that didn't happen. >> the documents edward snowden released about the surveillance programs around the world have angered some u.s. allies. >>> barts board of directors is expected to hold a special meeting in the next two weeks to vote on a new deal. the contract agreement will keep bart trains running for at least the next four years. the unions voted on friday to approve the deal. the board is now expected to ratify the contract at its next meeting. it calls for a
to the "washington post" and documents it obtained from the nsa leaker edward snowden. according to this report, field collectors processed, get this, 181,28 181,280,466 new records in one month. an operation of this kind in the united states is illegal. of course the nsa is allowed to operate overseas but not here. what from google and yahoo. released a statement saying the company is troubled by the allegation. a yahoo spokeswoman says we have not given access to our data centers to the nsa or any other government agency. clearly that is not the accusation. the accusation is that the nsa broke in, not that anybody gave anybody permission. in other words, the nsa broke the law. of course there's more. an italian magazine reports that the nsa may have spied on the pope and some cardinals. sources say the magazine -- sources at the magazine have been told that the nsa eavesdropped on vatican phone calls possibly around the time the former pope benedict's successor was under discussion. possibly, it reports before the conclave that top secret meeting of cardinals. a vatican spokesman could not or
.s. surveillance abroad. the material handed over to a reporter by nsa leaker edward snowden and it's providing a seemingly endless stream of revelations. those revelations are rocking america's relationships with some of its closest allies. christiane amanpour is joining us right now. you just spoke to the reporter who has been breaking all of these edward snowden leaks. what did he just tell you? >> reporter: well, first of all, they have thousands and thousands of documents but also, that he just simply rejects what, for instance, mike rogers, chairman of the house intelligence committee, british prime minister david cameron, many, many u.s. and other allied officials are saying, which is that this is dangerous, what they're doing, that they are putting all sorts of people at risk, they are compromising all sorts of abilities to close down terrorist cells and plots and this and that. he rejects that and always has. this is what he said to me on that. >> every terrorist who is capable of tying their own shoes has long known that the u.s. government and the uk government are trying to monitor
. about a month later, edward snowden began releasing real elevations about massive surveillance. in this kicked off a healthy public debate about how we balance privacy and security. and as you've heard from greg, it's our mission to try to improve the quality of public policy decision making which is an important discussion to be had. that's why we brought together the panel. people have different views. while everyone here has deep expertise in experience with part of it. we're hoping to have ab open discussion about it. in will be some thing they'll be unable to question. unable to an and just because of the situation. but we're going try to guide the discussion over a few topics today. we're going to start can with try to understand what works in intelligence and security. why do we feel we need to put it in place. we're going turn to what are the increased risk of mass collection of information on the public. and finally, turn to what is the -- what do the implications of this an how we implement foreign policy. with that sort of an overarching on the topic i like to see us
police went to his house by missed him by a matter of minutes. >>> plus edward snowden says the united states should cut him some slack. the white house says, think again. >>> and a scary moment during the texans colts game last night. >> year all very worried. we went back out. they told us that he was -- he was all right. he was stable. >> houston os head coach gary kubiak collapses on the field at halftime. what could have happened? "newsroom" continues now. >>> good morning. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for joining me. we have a better idea of just how -- of how -- just how troubled the l.a.x. shooting suspect paul ciancia was days before his deadly rampage. today he's in critical condition and unable to speak to investigators. but a woman who knows him and his roommates spoke exclusively to cnn. she said he and to be unraveling the days before the shooting and he was already making plans. >> he asked one of the roommates if he could have a ride to the airport. >> why did he need a ride? >> he was going back home. either that his dad was sick nsd had to deal with family is
's irresponsible with all due respect, mark. >> thank you very much to all of you. >>> up next, edward snowden writes a manifesto and says he has proof he did nothing wrong. talk about whether someone's a patriot or not. that's the question. >>> and later, a true american hero, iron man come to life in the pentagon right now u and a shout out. singer rheanna has done something she's never done before. her current number one is the monster. a collaboration with rapper em. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know the ancient pyramids were actually a mistake? uh-oh. geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you kno
about the fallout from the edward snowden leaks. >> this is the most serious leak, most serious compromise in the u.s. intelligence committee. >> because of the amount of it and the type. >> the amount and the type. >> website reboot. secretary of hhs kathleen sebelius faces questions on capitol hill wednesday after healthcare.gov went down over the weekend adding fuel to the criticism and more fodder for snl. >> i have a number of friendly tips to help you deal with those problems. for example, have you tried restarting your computer. sometimes it helps to turn the computer off and turn it back on. we don't know why. it just does. >> poetic license, the literally legend maya angelou joins us this hour. children's love for books. >> good day, i'm andrea mitchell in washington. edward snowden's leaks keep coming faster than the white house can even respond. over the weekend the nsa claimed president obama had no idea angela merkel's personal cell phone was tapped back since 2002. so how credible is that denial? joining me now is chuck todd nbc's white house correspondent, politic
made by former nsa contractor edward snowden. he describes himself as a whistleblower, but others say he's a traitor. >> christiane amanpour has spoken with the journalist who worked closely with edward snowden to expose these secrets and joins you now from london. you had that interview with glenn greenwald. what struck you most about him, he is one determined man on a bit of a mission really. >> he continues to insist that despite the vociferous criticism that officials have leveled at the snowden leaks and at him and the press for publishing them, it is not all about terrorism. he keeps saying loorks, they want us to believe that everything that's being leaked is just about life and death terrorism. but it's not. there are a lot of other revelations, a lot of revelations about economic and commercial and industrial espionage. there are a lot of revelations obviously which started the firestorm of protests around the world. about spying and collecting metadata from ordinary citizens. that is what really drives glen green wald really, really crazy and let me play you just a little bi
edwards snowden and a lot has changed since then, especially for the people who helped leak the information. jonathan betz has a look at that story. >> it's a global story that began in the summer with edward snowden. he is now in asylum in russia but the scandal keeps unfolding because he reported handed over almost all of his secrets to two journalists, greenwald who is based in brazil. he keeps breaking stories printed in papers all over the world, usually until countries where they will make the biggest splash. greenwald works as a columnist for the guardian. on thursday, he is leaving that british paper to help start a new journalistic venture funded by the founder of ebay. that site will likely continue revealing nsa stories. his reporting partner will join him there. she was actually the first to connecticut with snowden but works mainly behind the scenes. she is a film maker putting together a documentary about all of this and then there is julian assange. he had a minor role. nudge went to wikileaks but he did help him avoid u.s. authorities. he remained holed up in
and three people are under arrest. >>> to a brand new job tonight for edward snowden who is now living in russia. it comes as forbes magazine named president putin the most powerful leader in the world and putting president obama at number two, his rise in part due to the handling of snowden. tonight those reports that snowden is now employed again. abc's chief investigative correspondent brian ross on the case again tonight. >> reporter: in looking for a job with a moscow internet company ed snowden didn't have any references from his last employer, the u.s. intelligence community. he remains perhaps america's most wanted fugitive as he acknowledged. >> she'll stop at nothing to persecute someone who told the truth. >> reporter: while congress is considering changing laws because of snowden, u.s. officials testified he is nothing but a traitor. >> if you are asking me, absolutely. >> reporter: much of the outrage has to do with the embarrass the of the u.s. in spying on german chancellor angela merkel and the leaders of 34 countries. >> we have to repair the damage, otherwise it's goi
correct because of some of the issues that edward snowden has been able to put out. their mission lately has been to try to make the american people more aware of the terrorist plots that have been foiled because of their action. over theseen red chili summer and even this week general alexander and director clapper be more forthright over the plot that have been foiled third if you count europe, it gets into the couple dozen area. that is something we have to be able to put out there to give reassurance to people like your that the intelligence community are doing all they can to protect us from international terrorism. host: our guest, michael allen, managing director of beacon global strategies, author of "blinking red -- crisis and compromise in american intelligence after 9/11." former majority staff, other position similar to that as well. south carolina, democrat line. caller: hi, pedro. i had a comment and a question for mr. allen. you are uniquely qualified to answer my question. that ient is added up is am a retired master sergeant, and the phrase plausible deniability -- that
, the obama administration wants to intimidate whistle blowers. the more edward snowden can have a normalized and free life, the more it will let other whistle blowers come forward. >> again, if you ever want that platform, cash in is waiting, ready, willing and able to hear what you're ready to break. >> thanks, eric. >>> coming up, how the health care website being temporarily down can lift america back up for good. i'll explain. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] with five perfectly sweetened whole grains... you can't help but see the good. >>> time for what do i need to know for next week. you're first. >> i say we've been talking about health care. take a look at acadia health care. it's a psychiatric owner of facilities. been a study increase in earnings this last quarter. above 75%. >> very good. how about you jonathan? >> interest rates are higher this year, eric and it's helping the financial stocks, including a canadian life insurance company. strong on the charts, not widely owned. i'm looking to add to it. >> interesting. great calls lately, guys. thank you very much. that's it for
to company out -- >> snowden being the leaker. >> edward snowden being the leaker. we were talking about domestic spying and snooping on americans. here you have purely foreign intelligence and suddenly that's a crime as well. it's kind of an indication of the moving goal post of this debate. >> there's a great danger here domestically of the political backlash. think feinstein's trying to ward it off -- patrick leahy, there's sensenbrenner in the house, there's -- >> especially pushing legislation to stop the nsa from data collection. to let the aclu basically argue why certain things shouldn't be done, and to really handcuff our intelligence services the way that happened in the 1970s which indirectly led up to our failures that led to 9/11. >> how big a danger is that, mary? >> well, it's -- i think it's possible that, you know, you're going to get the momentum but it's incredibly naive. i mean, you know, as if -- if the u.s. stops doing this, then it won't be happening anymore. if the u.s. stops doing it, then the only ones doing it will be the chinese, the russians. you know, the br
whistle blowers. the more edward snowden can have a normalized and free life, the more it will let other whistle blowers come forward. >> again, if you ever want that platform, cash in is waiting, ready, willing and able to hear what you're ready to break. >> thanks, eric. >>> coming up, how the health care website being temporarily down can lift america back up for good. i'll explain. as a business owner, i'm constantly putting out fires. so i deserve a small business credit card with amazing rewards. with the spark cascard from capital one, i get 2% cash back on ery purchase, every day. i break my back around here. finally soone's recognizing me with unlimited rewards! meetings start at 11, cindy. [ male announcer get the spark business card from capital one. choose 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every d. what's in your wallet? i need your timesheets, larry! what's in your wallet? help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've
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